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Podcast: COVID-19 How to Win At Marketing Right Now

David Granfield:

Held down with four dog clips. Nice. We have just posted that we’re going live on Facebook and I’m about to go and go like hardcore SMSing out as well. So this is cool. We’re going to test like anyone who tunes into this later on, we’re just setting everything up right now. But we are about to go live on YouTube through Zoom, which is how we tweet as a team right now, and how a lot of people are finding they’re talking these days.

We’re just going to pump out a quick little text message to everyone. So sorry everyone, in advance but your phones are about to light up. For argument’s sake this message is going out to 1,731 people. So we’re pretty much almost the government, right? And the way that we’ve been able to do that for anyone that’s interested at home is we’ve got a really good CRM that we connect up with. 

So I’ve only got people who we’ve got the phone numbers, and we’re allowed to use that. We’re only sending this out to people who’ve have engaged with our content over the last three months or so. We’ve got thousands of people on our database, but we’re only sending it to the people who have actually engaged with us recently. So, it’s going to take a little while for that SMS to go out. There’s really only not many people watching us live on YouTube, but it is there and we’re just going to have a chat today guys.

David:

So Chris Mott, what do you do for Big Pixel, mate?

Chris Mott:

I do ads.

David:

Cool. Jay, what do you do for Big Pixel?

Jay Janus:

Chief Operating Officer. I look after all the boys and the girls on the team and just oversee the accounts, business operations. Yeah, all those sorts of fun things.

David:

Cool. Dean, besides growing awesome moustaches, what do you do, buddy?

Dean:

I also do ads. Ad Manager, meaning we speak to the clients.

David:

Making ads great again. So Dean, tell me, have you locked your brother, who is also housebound, outside so that he can’t become a YouTube statistic walking across the screen naked, or are we going to see something happen?

Dean:

You know what? I thought we’d keep it exciting. I haven’t informed him we’re live on the internet, so let’s see what happens.

David:

So, for those people watching at home, there is about a 20-second delay for what you see live on YouTube. So if the feed suddenly cuts out it’s because Dean’s brother has walked across the screen naked.

David:

So guys, I just wanted to… We generally push out content, Jay and I, Kristen and I, produce content about Facebook advertising and what’s working and what’s not working. I really wanted to take today to have a chat about what’s working right now because I don’t know if you agree with me guys, but there’s probably two sorts of people right now. There is the Chicken Little sky is falling down kind of person and then there is the grabbing Corona Virus by the balls and running with it and getting really good results.

Dean:

Yeah.

Chris:

I’d almost add a third category into that.

David:

Yeah, what’s that?

Chris:

Is the people that want to grab Corona Virus, by the balls but don’t know-how.

David:

Yeah. Look, I guess there are so many businesses right now that just don’t know how to capitalize or don’t know how to shift and transition into this. Like change management is a big thing and they might be a traditional business that just don’t know what to do. So let’s have a chat about that right now.

David:

If you are watching, there are a few people watching on YouTube, if you are watching, feel free to comment and we will answer your questions as we see them come in. If you are watching on YouTube, please also subscribe to our channel because that means that we know that you’re enjoying the content and we can push out more content like this.

David:

So Chris, what’s an industry that we’ve worked in and talked to, in the last maybe two weeks, that just are completely lost by this, but know they need to grab it by balls?

Chris:

I suppose service-based industries would be a strong one. Their business is predominantly outside of a warehouse or a factory and it’s at people’s houses, and they do have options. They just don’t know how to transition their business from a service-based to a goods-based business essentially.

David:

So I had a really good lead come in today, a butcher shop. It’s a hospitality-based butcher shop so all they do is produce meat for restaurants. They’re dead in the water, right? 

Every one of their customers has closed right now, and they’re trying to pivot and shift. I Googled them and I couldn’t even find any information. There’s no website. The phone number wasn’t connected anymore. These guys are hemorrhaging business right now and a really fast just smart strategy or even just getting a website or a Google business listing and pushing some content down on social media could save that business and get them selling directly to the consumer.

David:

Jay, what about you? What’re some industries that you’ve seen that could do things better right now?

Jay:

It’s a tough time at the moment. It’s a really tough time and I don’t know, definitely some industries are doing really well. People who sell online courses are doing great. People that sell products to help keep kids entertained, they’re doing really great. Puzzles are doing really great. Scott Morrison even said that on the latest update about an hour, or half an hour ago. Puzzles are selling-

David:

So ScoMo’s even said that jigsaw puzzles are going really well. So quick little prompt, the Melbourne map comes in jigsaw form. Melinda would love it if you guys want to buy that right now. She’s an amazing customer of ours. So, ScoMo endorses jigsaw puzzles.

Jay:

So things like that are doing really well. But the other thing that we’re finding is, I guess what you said before, is our clients who are really engaging, they’re aware and they’re not making light of the situation because obviously the situation is absolutely horrible and a really tough time for everybody. Some more than others. But in terms of business, our clients that are really running with it, and they’re kind of pivoting and they’re adapting what they need to, are crushing it. 

And that’s including clothing. I walked through a mall the other day. I had to go to the supermarket and walked through my local shopping centre, and everything is shut. All the standard big box brands are shut, with very little online presence. So these other people that were ready to go, they’re ready to kind of embrace, for lack of a better term, the current situation is doing really well in it.

David:

Yeah, cool. Dean, what about you? What can you see that could do with the disruption? So we might have some small businesses tuning in. There are a few more people starting to watch this video as we’re going a little bit further into it. What businesses do you think could be disrupted? What’s your little side business, mate and how could people find that? This is the era of side gigs becoming full-time jobs, and this is the era of disruption. So what’s something right now, and feel free to spruit your little side business if you do what buddy, but what can work? How can people find something to do right now?

Dean:

All right. My side business isn’t going to become my full time. I’m staying with you guys as long as you’ll have me. But obviously well, as with any time, anything that fills a need is popular right now. I just happen to sell raised garden beds on the side. All of a sudden, with all this happening and everyone staying home and wanting to become a bit more self-sufficient, everyone wants to grow gardens, so-

David:

I started watching Doomsday Preppers last night. I’m going to order a garden bed off you this week.

Dean:

Special price for you, David. Special price.

David:

One for the price of two.

Dean:

I’ve seen office furniture, in the same vein, really take off better than it already was with everyone setting up their home business.

David:

All right, so what’s the return on ad spend for that office business right now, the company that you’re working on?

Dean:

For March, it was 71 point something.

David:

So they spent $3,000 on advertising in March, and made what?

Dean:

Lots of money.

David:

Over $250,000 or something they ended up making. So even if you don’t make office furniture, like imagine if you’re a shopfitter right now and you’re dead in the water for shop fitting, can you build a flat pack desk that goes out to people as a standing desk at home? And can you get that product to market?

David:

Guys, as people are watching on YouTube, comment if you want. Tell us what your business is and tell us what your struggles are and we will brainstorm and come up with solutions for you.

David:

All right guys, what about Facebook advertising as a platform? How’s it tracking right now? Are there problems with it? Are there great things to be had from it? Is it expensive or is it cheap?

Dean:

Cheap as chips, bro. $2 CPMs.

David:

So $2 CPMs. So for those people that don’t know what a CPM is, it’s the cost per thousand, or cost per mille, which is like the what is that, French or Italian word for it? So, cost per thousand and usually like print media or TV advertising might be $26 to $30. That’s the cost per thousand. So if you pay $36 to get in front of a thousand people. What did you say you’re getting CPMs for now, Dean?

Dean:

Around $2. To be honest, I haven’t really been keeping a close eye on all my accounts, but I just had a look the other day on one of my accounts and yeah, they were $2. $2 all down the board.

David:

So, if [crosstalk 00:09:48] account manager is lying he’s keeping a very close eye on your account. Be like a CPM for $2,000 what industry, and how can you in your industry use $2 per thousand people right now to get some amazing brand awareness for some of the cheapest advertising costs ever? Chris, what are you seeing working?

Chris:

Shifting objectives and I like CPMs is a good one, definitely cheaper CPMs is awesome. But what we’re also seeing is the cost per thousand impressions is coming down, which means we’re getting in front of more people because we’re not shifting our budgets in a lot of cases. In some cases, we’re actually scaling and we’re spending more money. 

The click-through rate is through the roof, everybody’s surfing, everybody’s window shopping on the internet, on websites, and the data that comes with having the right tracking installed on your websites from cheaper CPMs and higher click through rates, like now is the time to go berserk with data collection. [Crosstalk 00:00:10:52].

David:

It’s an audience-building time right?

Chris:

100%.

Dean:

Yeah. Even if you have… Oh, sorry, I drowned Chris, you go.

Chris:

No, you’re all right, mate. Go.

Dean:

Even if your sales have tanked, which is the case for a few of my clients, but they are setting themselves up awesomely for when everything goes back to normal. They may be having a stop financially at the moment, but the content they’re putting out there is just really positive, real topical. 

It gives value to its target audience. They’re getting more visits to their website, or just more engagement online. They’re just setting themselves up as positive people, people who know what they’re talking about, so when we get back to when people do want to spend money again, who do you think they’re going to spend that money with?

David:

100%. So I talked on an Instagram Live this week, about 2020 is the age of leadership marketing, and it’s… I hate the word thought leader, it’s been played out, but if you can convey truth and honesty… Whose dog is that?

Dean:

Yeah. Sorry. Well, technically not my dog because it’s a foster.

David:

It’s a foster dog. Dean fosters dogs if you don’t know that. Dean’s got two foster dogs that he’s looking to foster out, or looking for loving homes right now. So Dean, what’s your Instagram handle for the foster dogs?

Dean:

Barkerrescue, one word.

David:

There you go, Barkerescue. If you want a foster a dog that barks, go see Dean. Actually, one of them barks, the other one of them doesn’t.

David:

Where was I talking? What was I talking about then?

Chris:

Instagram Live.

David:

Instagram Live. So we’re talking about 2020 is the age of leadership marketing, and people want a leader. People want someone who is an expert on their field, an expert on their product, or their service, but also ethically tries to get that information out there. So a massive amount of top of funnel awareness right now will help you for a middle of funnel sort of education and motivation when the time is right to purchase your product.

David:

So Jay, do you want to touch on like top of the funnel? Great, extremely cheap click-through rates, extremely cheap, cost per thousands. What do they do with that data while they’re building it now? What’s the next step from there?

Jay:

Collect it. Sort it, collect it. [inaudible 00:13:06] whether in order to reuse them later on. Whether it’s a level of engagement that people have had, whether they might have liked a post or commented on a post or Instagram or something along those lines. 

They might have liked your page, they might’ve been on your website and just visited the website and added to your wishlist, or add to cart, or window shopped. So they’re all audiences that we can build from and generate at the moment. And then from there, we can obviously go on on lookalike audiences and a whole range of different targeting and different segmenting that we can do there.

David:

Yeah. Awesome. Let’s circle back to that segmenting and that targeting a little bit more.

David:

I just want to reach out. Anyone on the YouTube right now, comment and say hi. Comment where you are. Let us know who you are.

David:

And guys, Louise Rollings asked a question on YouTube. She sells organic perfume, soaps and aromatherapy products. What can she do right now? Organic soaps, perfume and aromatherapy products, how can we help her right now?

Jay:

I mean, soaps right now, anything around cleaning is… We’ve all seen what the shelves are like at the supermarket, in the cleaning aisle. 

Get online, sell like organic. The least you can do is get online and post organically. Next to that would be fire up the Ads Manager, put a little bit of budget behind it and get in front of people. As Dave said earlier, get a Google business page up so people can find you online with a website. They’re probably the first things that I’d be looking at.

David:

Do you know what the first home sort of made thing that I bought this week was? It was a little thing of sanitizer because I couldn’t find hand sanitizer anyway. Chris Mott’s probably got one sitting on his desk that he’s about to pick up right now as well. He’s making his own at home from Dettol, or something right now.

Chris:

Pine O Clean. [crosstalk 00:15:16] muck around.

David:

Chris is carrying around a squirty bottle of Pine O Clean with him everywhere. Chris’ wife also has an autoimmune problem or disease so he’s stripping naked in the garage when he gets home as well.

David:

But Louise, you’ve got an amazing range of products that are organic and you’ve got the perfect target market right now because people can’t find it anywhere else, and people are still picky on what they want to buy. 

So getting that information out there hard and fast now, and even if it’s some top of funnel awareness that tells people why or how they should be finding these organic products, even if they don’t purchase from you now, you’ve got them in an audience that you can get back to later.

David:

Pickle and juice-

Chris:

Another really big one just on that one too is being honest and be genuine in this point in time because there are a lot of people who are trying to be sharks and take advantage of the fact that they have hands-on supplies of toilet paper, and price gouging. Now’s the time to build that initial trust when people need you most so that they’re willing to hang around for longer.

David:

So Facebook won’t even let you advertise anything like hand sanitizer related, like face masks. It’s like a blanket ban across advertising, anything to do with capitalizing on this misfortune right now. So you’ve got to be smart about it.

David:

Just quickly, Linda Carrie, hello from the Gold Coast. David Whitaker, hello in Melbourne.

Dean:

With the soaps as well, Mother’s Day is coming up in a month so chuck a package together [crosstalk 00:16:48].

David:

Mind-blowing, right? So Louise, can you just comment in your website URL in the comments, and we’ll make sure it gets in the description because I’m dead in the water finding my wife and my mother something for Mother’s Day unless they want some hand sanitizer, right? 

Like you’ve got your perfect target market audience is coming up right now. You can get your message out there to males that leave everything for the last minute and you’ve suddenly got a massive target audience, and you can sell benefits on that. What I’d encourage you to do is find the hidden benefits around your product or your service. So yes, an organic soap will wash your hands organically, but what are the hidden benefits of why people would want to buy it and why they need to buy it from you now?

David:

What’s another business that’s doing really well for us right now, guys? Don’t have to mention the business, or you can shout out the business name if you want, but what’s some industries that we’re getting really good results for and how have we changed their advertising strategy to make it work?

Jay:

We’re getting good results for some women’s clothing brands. The mom at home that values fashion at the moment is doing extremely well, like ridiculously well actually. 

We’re seeing great results from there. I guess, we’re very privileged to get the insights into a lot of different businesses and a lot of different verticals, and one thing, I guess, we’re seeing is that people are still spending money. 

There’s obviously a lot of stimulus packages and a lot of pain at the moment, but because we get to see inside all of these different accounts and business, there is so much money being spent, and there’s a lot of holes in the marketplace that are ripe to be filled with new brands, new up and comers. 

When you have large brands, the Kmarts or the Zaras or etcetera, who don’t have physical stores open anymore, people go online, and online stores are crushing it.

David:

Very good. What did you find out the other day when we were looking at a couple of bricks and mortar sort of big-name brands? You don’t have to name the name brands themselves, but Jay was doing a search the other day. 

You can use Facebook’s Ads Library to see who’s currently running ads, and some of the biggest retailer names in Australia right now, who are in financial trouble and the mass media is reporting about their downturn and then they’re closing stores, they have online stores, but they’re not actually running Facebook or Instagram ads right now.

Jay:

Or Google.

David:

Or Google ads, right? Talk about an age of disruption where the big traditional brand names, household names, are failing to be as reactive as the mum and dad businesses who operate out of a garage and sell a million and a half dollars of clothing a year.

Jay:

Yeah. I think next six months, or however long is going to be, really interesting to see what level of disruption occurs in the typical retail space. 

People who would have gone in and shopped at Kmart or at Target or Zara during the week are moving online so I’m really interested to see which brands, which businesses that are purely online, really start to tackle that size and that scale. I think it’s going to happen.

David:

So it kind of makes our tag line on our whole company right now, it’s on the homepage of our website, bigpixel.com and it is making small brands feel big. So building up these mom and dad businesses who are doing a half a million, a million, a million a half, to take on these large companies that can’t be as agile in these times. But also, we want to help those big brands act small. And social media is just that, it’s people wanting to socially interact with each other.

David:

I think, Dean, you coined a really good phrase the other week on this, that people are on social media to interact with accounts that they’re following and the content that they want to see. They’re not there to be sold to from ads. And a really highly polished ad is not necessarily a good user experience on an Instagram feed or Facebook feed.

David:

All right guys, what’s a bit of a positive thing? What can someone do in the next week if they haven’t already done it to make sure that they are going to have the best transition period through this?

Chris:

If they haven’t got Ads Manager, get it, whether or not they put any money towards something. Get the pixel installed on your website, start tracking your organic traffic.

David:

Just be able to track the traffic all right.

Chris:

Just be able to track the traffic because there is so much organic activity at the moment as well. People are looking like you say, the big players are not pushing hard into space. People are looking for best of the breed. They’re looking for Australian made, they’re looking for local businesses. They’re just Googling, Googling, Googling, and they will hit a hundred websites before they even realize it.

David:

Yeah. So I’ve got a good friend of mine, Richie, who runs a fabrication business. So generally fabrication businesses would not think that they can sell products online, right? They’re used to selling face to face, phone on phone conversation. 

Richie’s fabrication business, we fired up $5 a day worth of advertising for him. Currently, he’s getting 160 times return on ad spend. So for every $1 he spends, he gets $160 in return. And you know what the massive thing is? He sells five, six, $700 products, so he’s literally spending $16 and making thousands upon thousands of dollars in sales to a market that he’s never advertised to before, or a market that he’s never got in front of before. 

And he hasn’t followed some secret recipe of advertising, he’s just got on there and the ads are written in his voice, they’re photos taken from a phone, and he’s getting that message out there to someone who’s never seen it before. People are buying, right? People are buying hand over foot.

David:

Another industry that we’re seeing doing really well is home improvements right now. So Jay, what’re some businesses in home improvement that could really go gangbusters with some advertising?

Jay:

Plumbers, that’s one big one.

David:

Did you say that the other day, didn’t you? Blocked toilets, plumbers.

Jay:

Yeah. I listened to the radio the other day, and it was a local council talking about cleaning their drains out. They’re finding towels and hand towels and material cloth and carpet being flushed down. So you’re in a bad place if you’re having to clean yourself if with carpet. So you’re a plumber-

Chris:

People are ripping up carpet.

Jay:

Yeah. People should be buying shares in plumbing companies, but that’s not financial advice.

David:

Okay. So how could a plumber right now capitalize on this? What would be the simple steps that they’d do to make sure that they’d be getting in front of people who are flushing carpet down their bloody toilets?

Jay:

Super simple. Have a website, number one. Fire up Squarespace. Wix is a simple website builder. First, and then you get a Google page, like Google business page. Third thing, on your website, install a Facebook pixel and then fourth thing, and that comes hand in hand with having a Facebook page, and then capture people there. Then run some ads. Run some ads locally and drive them to say a calendar booking. So you just automate your leads, so your calendar is booked out days, weeks, months in advance.

David:

So use Acuity. Use some sort of scheduling platform.

Jay:

A calendar even.

David:

Use Trader Mate. Use anything that’s like… There are platforms built for your industry. So if you know a plumber, if you’re watching this or if you’re watching us later on, if you know a plumber, get them to just watch this little section because a well-crafted ad, like you put a picture of your high-pressure water blaster pipe cleaner thing that you drive around on a trailer, which sits underutilized for 10 months of the year. You put a picture of that on Instagram and on Facebook right now and put some really crafty wording behind it and that thing is the wheels are going to fall off at the bearings are going to collapse because it gets used so much in the next couple of weeks.

David:

Right, our home improvements. What did our creative director, Paulie, buy and get delivered the other day? What was on that-

Chris:

Mulch, wasn’t it?

David:

Mulch.

Chris:

Was it mush.

David:

Landscape suppliers, you all have trucks to deliver out products, putting some ads out there while everyone’s stuck at home. I am getting thrown so many honey-dos. You guys know what a honey-do is? Honey do this, honey do that, right? I’m getting thrown so many honey-dos that getting a couple of cubic meters of mulch or a couple of cubic meters of crusher dust or blue metal to fix the driveways and the paths, like that’s the perfect time to be selling that product. 

And it could literally just be a ad of your truck, because your truck has the business name and the phone number on it, the side of it, and a picture of your truck saying what products you can deliver, and a phone number. Five K radius around your business, done. Say something funny in the ad. Call out the husbands, call out the wives. It’s probably the wives that are going to be the one purchasing because they’re not the ones doing the bloody manual labour shovelling it. But landscapers is can get a massive, massive market share right now. And if anything, build an audience through this period as well.

David:

What other industries for small business could be disrupted guys?

Dean:

I need two air conditioners repaired right now. So along the same lines as the plumbers, I guess. Everyone’s at home all of a sudden running their aircons all day suddenly.

David:

Everyone’s at home running their air conditioners. I know very well from the colour of the curtains behind Chris Mott that he’s sitting in a customer’s office that sells solar systems for a living, right? 

Solar companies right now, imagine the bills that everyone’s going to start getting from air conditioners running, pool pumps running a bit more, just the heating and the lighting and everything on, the fridge opening 10 times more than it used to open. Power expenses are going to go up right now. How can a solar or an electrical business capitalize on this? 

And knowing that people are tightening down their wallets as well, so how can you present that message that it’s going to be cost-effective to put a three and a half or $4,000 solar system on your roof now to save money in the long run?

David:

What else is there?

Jay:

We’ve covered a fair bit of at the moment, it’s great.

David:

That’s like 30 minutes worth of time. I was going to cut this at 30 minutes actually. I wouldn’t mind doing this every day or so, just having a chat. We’ve had some good comments come online. We’ve got people watching right now. Guys, people like you. 

But look, I guess what the final encouragement would be, don’t be that Chicken Little business. Don’t think the sky is falling. Spend some time and make sure that you advertise your business and market your business because it’s a fantastic time price-wise. It’s a fantastic time to adjust your messaging, and it’s a fantastic time to just unite with Australia. One of you said before Ozzie made products, it’s that time, right? Australia is going through a bit of a shift and Australia is going through a bit of a disruption which is going to ultimately change how we operate, in a sense, in a lot of senses, right?

David:

Chris, have you got anything you want to finish off with?

Chris:

Yeah. I think the biggest thing for a lot of businesses at the moment is just all those ideas that had been shelved for the last two years, take them off the shelf. Everything’s fair game. All the ideas that you’ve put to the side because you just thought they were rubbish, now is the time to bring them out and see how they operate.

David:

So Chris and Jay, do you have YouTube open at the moment? Are you watching it on YouTube as well?

Jay:

No.

Chris:

No. I try and avoid watching myself.

David:

Dean does not. Dean has just got on there and commented, is that Dean guy single? He is cute. So, hey everyone watching, Dean is single. He loves to ride mountain bikes. He fosters dogs. Dean, what’s your final closing moments, right? Do you want to give out your phone number, or your street address or something?

Dean:

Man, it’s hard moving all dating to online, let me tell you. But we’re not here to talk about that. Stay positive. If you’re not smashing it sales-wise, and if you can’t see a way to do that, give your target audience something else of value, even if it’s encouragement.

David:

[email protected] ladies, by the way.

David:

Jay, what’s your final bit of encouragement for small businesses, or big businesses, or anyone who the sky’s falling in on right now?

Jay:

Reach out for support. Reach out to other business people in your network or people that might be complimentary to you. Reach out and just see how they’re going and have a chat. Sometimes having that extra set of eyes from the outside might be enough to spark an idea that enables you to pivot and adapt somewhat in a way that you haven’t thought of yourself.

David:

Yeah. Very cool. Cool, let’s wrap this up. I’ll first say my final thing. Even like childcare right now, we’ve got actually Jay, another Jay, who’s one of our good customers, is sharing the office space here at the moment because he’s displaced. I was talking to him this morning. One, ScoMo’s just announced some amazing things with the childcare industry, which is going to help Jay, because he owns four childcare centres. 

But two, already last week Jay had talked to Chris and me about running a campaign now to build his audience and get an audience database out there. So around all of his four centres, he knows that people are unenrolling kids at childcare centres right now. He knows that people are pulling their kids out of childcare centres. It just so happens that Jay’s got four amazingly renovated centres, which are beautiful. But they’re running, one center was brand new, and it was running at 30% occupancy.

David:

He’s using this time now to put some brand awareness ads out there and he’s gamefying that a little bit, and we might share how he’s done that in an upcoming episode. But he’s building an audience data set now so that by the time everyone’s ready to go back to childcare centres, he’s top of mind. He’s the first person they’re going to think about and he should get a hundred per cent occupancy before the other centres around him.

David:

So guys, how do you shift your mindset? How do you shift your thinking? How do you adjust and leverage and pivot? And don’t use the excuse of you can’t afford to advertise right now because as Dean said, you can be getting in front of thousands of people for literally one, two, three, $4, right? Like if you’re smart about it, it’s an amazing time to be advertising.

David:

Chris, Jay, Dean, thank you very much guys. We pulled this off. We’ve had people watching consistently the whole time. We’ve pulled it off. Josh was hounding me, asking me to produce some content to get out over the social media platforms the next couple of days. So the three of you just helped me do that.

David:

If you’ve got any questions, if you’re watching at home, if you’re watching this afterwards, or if the teams cut this up and it’s all on Instagram and Facebook, ask some questions in the comments. We do read every single question that we get on our social media channels and we do try and answer those in a fairly timely manner. Ask your questions in the comments below. Reach out to us. [email protected] if you’re a single woman in your… I don’t think he’s picky, right? Any age bracket works. And definitely we’d love you to support our YouTube channel by subscribing to the YouTube channel. You’ll get notifications when this goes out.

David:

I did send out 1,700 SMS to people before we went live on this, so I’m sorry if you’re offended by that. But we kind of did get your opt-in before we did that, so thank you for those that tuned in. We’re going to do this a little bit more often. We’re going to maybe make this a bit of a formality, if I can lock the boys down and steal some of their time. So thank you gentlemen, and let’s get back to making money for some people.

Jay:

Thank you.

Chris:

Thank you.

David:

Loverly.

Jay:

Cheers.

Dean:

Thanks all.

David:

See you guys.

Dean:

Thanks all.

David:

See you guys.

Jay:

Bye.

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